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2018 All-Scientists’ Meeting
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Saturday, September 29
 

6:00pm

Dinner
Dinner on Saturday, September 29 is included for guests who are staying the night of September 29 on site.

 
Sunday, September 30
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Breakfast on Sunday, September 30 is included for people who stayed at Asilomar on the night of September 29th.

8:30am

Education and Outreach Managers Pre-Meeting
Lead Organizer
avatar for Jill Haukos

Jill Haukos

Director of Education, Kansas State University
avatar for Caitlin Potter

Caitlin Potter

Education and Community Engagement Coordinator, Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve

Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office



Sunday September 30, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
13. Surf and Sand Meeting Room

8:30am

Graduate Representatives Pre-Meeting
Lead Organizer
avatar for Paul Julian

Paul Julian

University of Florida
Generally, I am an aquatic ecologist and biogeochemist studying soil and water column nutrients relative to internal and external driving forces from a local to global scale. While I enjoy studying all aquatic systems (i.e. lakes, rivers, wetlands, estuaries, etc.), I am passionate... Read More →

Co-organizers

Sunday September 30, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

8:30am

Information Managers Pre-Meeting
LTER Information Managers Committee Meeting Agenda
Evergreen Meeting Room, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific City, CA 
Sunday, September 30, 2018, 8:30 am - 5 pm
  • 8:30 am - Introductions and Overview of IMC meeting (30 minutes)
    Quick round-robin of all participants.  State name, site and length of time with LTER.
  • 9:00 am - NCO/EDI Reports, updates, Q/A (45 minutes)
    5-10 minute update from each group with 5-10 minutes of QA for each
    NCO - Mark Schildhauer
    EDI - Mark Servilla
  • 9:45 am - IMC Visioning intro (15 minutes)
    Intro to the types of visioning questions we could address
    organize into groups (by number call) of 5-6 people
  • 10:00 am - Group Photo and break (30 minutes)
  • 10:30 am - IMC Visioning Breakouts (90 minutes)
    Breakout into 5-6 small groups (5-6 people each)
  • 12:00 pm - Lunch at Crocker Dining Hall (60 minutes)
  • 1:00 pm - IMC Visioning Breakouts Report out (30 minutes)
    Each breakout group has about 5 minutes with questions
  • 1:30 pm -  Plenary Discussion on renewals and reviews (45 minutes)
    What do IMs need to do to prepare for reviews and renewals?  
    What are the tasks and what is the timeline?
    What sets a site up for success?
  • 2:15 pm - Plenary Discussion on EML 2.2 Implementation (45 minutes)  
    How will sites implement the new features?
  • 3:00 pm - Afternoon Break (30 minutes)
  • 3:30 pm - Formal Business Meeting (closed voting session) (30 minutes)
  • 4:00 pm - Meeting with NSF Program Officers (30 minutes)
  • 4:30 pm - Wrap-up and IMC action items (30 minutes)
  • 5:00 pm - Adjourn
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pre-Meeting Preparation

Information Management Committee Annual Report (2018) to the LTER Executive Board
https://lternet.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/LTER-Information-Management-Committee-Annual-Report-2018.pdf

2017 LTER Information Management Committee Annual Meeting Report
https://lternet.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/2017IMCAnnualMeetingReport_final.pdf

LTER IMC Monthly Virtual Water Cooler (VWC) Sessions:
2018
September 10 2018 - Discussion topics for our IMC Visioning breakout groups and our 30 minute session with NSF at our Annual IMC Meeting
August 13 2018 - Working Group updates
IM Website Improvement and Redesign (WIRED) - (Suzanne Remillard) 
LTER Unit Registry & Dictionary (Units) - (Margaret O'Brien, EDI)
July 9 2018 - Working Group updates
LTER Controlled Vocabulary (Vocab) - (John Porter)
Drupal Ecological Information Management System (DEIMS) - (Xia Yang)
EML Congruency Checker (ECC) - (Gastil Buhl)
June 11 2018 - Proposed agenda for our 1-day annual IMC meeting and continued discussion about ASM workshops
May 14 2018 - Workshop and Topic planning for Annual IMC Meeting and ASM
April 9 2018 - EML 2.2 Spring release and new and improved standard units (Margaret O'Brien and Matt Jones)
March 12 2018 - How the LTER IMC should adapt to the emerging multi-repository landscape for archiving LTER data (Wade Sheldon with invited guests from other repositories)
February 12 2018 - Continued ASM Planning (Gastil Buhl)
January 8 2018 - New LTER website hosted by NCO (Marty Downs, NCO)

2017
December 11 2017 - 2018 All-Scientists’ Meeting (ASM) workshop planning
November 13 2017 - Datetime checking in PASTA -  (Margaret O'Brien, EDI)
EML Congruency Checker (ECC) new check: datetime
October 16 2017 - IMC Bylaws; review draft, discuss, RFC, eventual vote/accept - (Don Henshaw)
September 11 2017 - LTER Unit Registry & Dictionary - (Margaret O'Brien, EDI)
July 24 2017 - LTER IMC Annual Meeting, in conjunction with Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), Bloomington, IN

Lead Organizer
avatar for Gastil Buhl

Gastil Buhl

Information Manager, MCR LTER

Co-organizers
avatar for Stevan Earl

Stevan Earl

Arizona State University



Sunday September 30, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

8:30am

Science Council Meeting
Co-organizers
FD

Frank Davis

Executive Director, LTER-Network Communications Office
Dr. Frank Davis has primary responsibility for the NCO’s successful operation and works with LTER and NSF leadership to ensure that the NCO meets the needs of LTER sites. A biogeographer with extensive experience in scientific synthesis, Frank served as founding Deputy Director... Read More →
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies



Sunday September 30, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

12:00pm

6:00pm

Welcome Reception
Gather with colleagues to start the week off on a convivial note. The welcome reception will include substantial hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar and will be served in place of dinner for committee members and arriving guests. 

Sunday September 30, 2018 6:00pm - 8:30pm
Seascape Dining Room
 
Monday, October 1
 

7:30am

8:30am

Plenary 1: Stephanie Hampton / Kathleen Weathers
Welcome and Brief Announcements
Frank Davis, Executive Director, LTER Network Communications Office
Peter Groffman, Chair of the LTER Science Council

Introductory Remarks:
Terrence Quinn, National Science Foundation, Director, Division of Ocean Sciences

Plenary Speakers:
Stephanie Hampton, National Science Foundation, Director, Division of Environmental Biology
Dr. Hampton joined the National Science Foundation in May 2018 after serving as the Director of the Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach (CEREO) at Washington State University where she is a Professor in the School of the Environment. Previously she was Deputy Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) for 8 years. Throughout her career, she has built connections –between disparate fields, between producers and consumers of data, between basic ecological research and its many applications. She strives to promote data sharing, open science, and wider adoption of cutting-edge informatics for more effective and transparent environmental research.Hampton’s background is in aquatic science, statistical analysis, and environmental informatics. Her research includes analyzing long-term ecological data collected from lakes as globally diverse as Lake Baikal in Siberia and Lake Washington in Seattle. Together with collaborators, she has shown how lakes respond to municipal management practices such as sewage diversion. She has also helped demonstrate the effects of climate change on plankton—the basic building blocks of aquatic food webs – with a recent emphasis on the implications of winter ice loss across the globe.

Kathleen Weathers, Cary Institute, Senior Scientist
Dr. Weathers has served as the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Steering Committee Co-Chair for the past decade. She is Principal Investigator for the GLEON Fellowship Program’s training of next-generation network scientists. She also leads GLEON’s commitment to the U.S. government-led Climate Data Initiative, its Water Theme, and the GLEON Lake Observer App development. Weathers’ research focuses on quantifying how biology affects geochemistry and biogeochemical cycling across heterogeneous landscapes, and within and among multiple systems (air-land-water). Whether studying how cyanobacteria alter lake resilience or how fog changes the structure and function of forest ecosystems, she has pursued scientific questions that are critical to landscape-level integration and ”big” data-inspired research. Weathers is an elected fellow to the Ecological Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is the recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Eugene P. Odum Award.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Hampton

Stephanie Hampton

Division Director (DEB), National Science Foundation
Dr. Hampton joined the National Science Foundation in May 2018 after serving as the Director of the Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach (CEREO) at Washington State University where she is a Professor in the School of the Environment. Previously she was Deputy... Read More →
avatar for Kathleen Weathers

Kathleen Weathers

Senior Scientist, Cary Institute
Dr. Weathers has served as the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Steering Committee Co-Chair for the past decade. She is Principal Investigator for the GLEON Fellowship Program’s training of next-generation network scientists. She also leads GLEON’s commitment... Read More →


Monday October 1, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
02. Merrill Hall Asilomar Conference Grounds

10:30am

Bridging Ecological and Hydrological Drought Responses Across the LTER network
This workshop explores connections between hydrological and ecological responses of drought in terrestrial ecosystems across the LTER network. Specifically, the objectives of this workshop are to: (1) discuss how we think about drought responses at different LTER sites; (2) Synthesize these responses into workable hypotheses related to drought propagating through the LTER network; and, (3) develop a plan to mobilize our ideas into a publishable paper. This graduate student led workshop expands on ideas cultivated from a working group from the previous ASM in 2015. We will discuss how our ideas have developed since then and we welcome anyone interested in the ecohydrology of drought across all LTER sites to participate.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Dominick Ciruzzi

Dominick Ciruzzi

PhD Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison
I'm a hydroecologist interested in groundwater-forest interactions in a changing world.

Co-organizers
avatar for Aaron Hogan

Aaron Hogan

PhD Student, Florida International University


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

10:30am

Dataset Annotation in EML 2.2
Dataset annotation is the addition of a critical or explanatory note to improve discovery and understanding. Additional power is gained by annotating specific parts of a dataset with external vocabularies that have been curated within scientific domains. In this session, we will summarize the current use of vocabularies in LTER datasets (e.g., as “keywords”), and illustrate how this can be enhanced with the more detailed annotation features of EML 2.2. Expected discussion topics include clarification of annotation concepts, mechanisms LTER sites could employ to take advantage of annotation enhancements, choosing vocabularies to use and support, and potentially necessary software tools.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

10:30am

NEON Data: From Collection to Publication
This workshop will be divided into two sections. The first half will provide a general overview of the field, instrumented, and remote sensing data the NEON collects; how it is processed, quality checked, and documented; and how it is published and made accessible to the community. The second half will be devoted to answering your questions and discussing how NEON can improve data discovery, accessibility, documentation, and formatting for use in your research and classrooms.

Lead Organizer
CL

Christine Laney

Data Scientist, Battelle, National Ecological Observatory Network

Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
11. Sanderling Meeting Room

10:30am

Scaling-Up Productivity Responses to Changes in Biodiversity
Although hundreds of short-term local experiments indicate that random changes in biodiversity can cause substantial changes in primary productivity, it remains unclear whether these influences of biodiversity are weaker or stronger at larger scales in natural ecosystems. Our synthesis working group is developing and testing strategies for scaling-up results from biodiversity experiments and inferring causality from observations. In this workshop, we will provide an update on progress to date, share a new method for quantifying insurance effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning, and present approaches for causal inference in observational data. We seek to identify new collaborators and data from LTER sites.

Lead Organizer
FI

Forest Isbell

University of Minnesota

Co-organizers
avatar for Laura Dee

Laura Dee

University of Minnesota


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

10:30am

Scanning the Horizon of the LTER Network: Future Initiatives and Scientific Advances
Grad students and post-docs are the backbone of science. LTER grad students and post-docs are uniquely suited to envision the future of science as we encompass a wide range of scientific disciplines and, as LTER network PI roles turnover in the coming decades, many of us will likely become leaders within the LTER network and our own respective fields.

The aim of this workshop is to for LTER grad students and post-docs to scan the horizon of the LTER Network and its representative scientific disciplines. By scanning the horizon, we will discuss how we envision future directives of the LTER network, such as new thematic elements, and how scientific theories will be advanced as LTER datasets lengthen. This workshop will begin with a presentation on the history of the LTER Network and how it got its start, given by Dr. Dan Childers (Director, CAP-LTER). We will then form break-out groups to discuss research areas we think will be important areas of discovery in the future.



Speakers
avatar for Luke Lamb

Luke Lamb

M.S. Student, Florida International University
I'm a M.S. student interested in ecosystem ecology and a career in research and specifically investigates the indicators of coastal marsh peat collapse in the Florida Coastal Everglades.

Co-organizers
avatar for Luke Lamb

Luke Lamb

M.S. Student, Florida International University
I'm a M.S. student interested in ecosystem ecology and a career in research and specifically investigates the indicators of coastal marsh peat collapse in the Florida Coastal Everglades.


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

10:30am

Shaping the Future of Public Engagement with Science at LTERs: A Roundtable Discussion
Public engagement with science (PES) researchers and practitioners are building an evidence base across several fields, including informal science education, communications, sociology, political science, and environmental science. We suggest LTER sites, with their intrinsic time investments and place-based connections to people and communities, are ideal laboratories for advancing PES. Join us for a roundtable dialogue about the potential for LTERs to serve as sites of PES innovation and for PES to expand and enrich LTER science. Intro presentations will share progress from NSF-funded PES development at Hubbard Brook and Harvard Forest. During the dialogue we hope to draw out examples of PES research and practice at other sites and plant the seeds for a PES research + practice network.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Sarah Garlick

Sarah Garlick

Director of Science Policy and Outreach, Hubbard Brook Research Foundation

Co-organizers
avatar for John Besley

John Besley

Ellis N. Brandt Chair, Michigan State University
I study public opinion about science and scientists' opinions about the public. My goal is to improve the effectiveness of science communication by helping science communicators be more strategic. That means figuring out what you want (goals) and then figuring out what you can communicate... Read More →
KF

Kathy Fallon Lambert

Science Policy Exchange


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

10:30am

Synthesizing long-term research field and remote sensing data on major ecological disturbances
A major challenge in ecosystem science is evaluating how legacies of disturbance interact to influence system sensitivity and/or resilience to novel rates of chronic climate and land use changes. The recent 2017 hurricane season affected several LTER sites, including the FCE, LUQ, and GCE sites. This workshop will review research findings to date on the impact and possible recovery trajectories for sites hit by these powerful storms (90 minutes). In addition, we will provide hands-on training in Google Earth Engine and R programming to measure long-term trends in forest extent and 3D structure changes to help connect field level measurements with landscape patterns caused by extreme events (90 minutes).

Lead Organizer
DL

David Lagomasino

University of Maryland

Co-organizers
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

10:30am

The Challenges and Accomplishments of Long-Term Ecological Research
This workshop accompanies a poster describing an ongoing, multi-authored book project encapsulating activities in the first 35 years of the LTER Network. The book, edited by Robert Waide and Sharon Kingsland, will explore, explain, and analyze different aspects of the history of the LTER program both prior to 1980, when it was created, and since 1980, as it has developed. Our broad goal is to assess and explain how LTER developed in the way it did, how problems and challenges were addressed, and, where appropriate, to offer commentary on what might have been done differently and what lessons can be learned from the past (both from successes and failures).

Lead Organizer
avatar for Robert Waide

Robert Waide

University of New Mexico

Co-organizers
SK

Sharon Kingsland

Johns Hopkins University


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 1 of 2: Climate Change at LTER Sites
This is part 1 of  a 2-part, 180-minute workshop. 
As at 2012 and 2015 ASMs, participating sites will present their current understanding of how climate is changing and how the ecosystem has responded at that site. We will examine forcing (i.e., temperature, precipitation); geophysical responses (e.g., ice, snow, permafrost, streamflow, sea or lake level, upwelling, drought); and responses in LTER core areas (organic matter, inorganic cycling, trophic relationships, primary productivity, disturbances). Reports in 2015 from 25 sites indicated widespread changes in phase and timing of water; hypoxia, acidification, salinity; changes in C and N; pests and diseases, mortality, migration, loss of habitat connectivity; and altered disturbance (wildfire, cyclones). 

Lead Organizer
JJ

Julia Jones

Professor, Oregon State University

Co-organizers
avatar for Art Miller

Art Miller

Research Oceanographer, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Art Miller is a Research Oceanographer (equivalent to Full Professor) and a Senior Lecturer in Climate Sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD). He is also currently Head of the Oceans and Atmosphere Section, which includes the CASPO Division and MPL. He is a physical... Read More →
DH

David Hondula

Arizona State University
JC

John Campbell

USDA Forest Service
TH

Teehee Hwang

Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 1 of 2: Ecological Connectivity in a Changing World: An LTER Synthesis
This is part 1 of a 2-part (180-minute) session. The concept of ecological connectivity is central to the hypotheses at many LTER sites. The application of the concept may differ across LTER studies, with some focusing on hydrologic connectivity and others focusing on population connectivity. This breadth of understanding across the LTER sites allows for a unique contribution on the importance of ecological connectivity. In some contexts, connectivity may exacerbate instability, while in other contexts it may enhance ecosystem resilience. The goal of this workshop is to synthesize the findings and predictions related to ecological connectivity across LTER sites. We invite participants from all sites, especially those who use the concept of connectivity as part of their hypotheses. (This is part 1 of a 2-part workshop.)

Lead Organizer
avatar for Ruth Heindel

Ruth Heindel

University of Colorado Boulder, INSTAAR

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

10:30am

Part 1 of 2: How to Use Video Storytelling to Share Your Science
Short videos have become an accessible and popular way to share scientific information clearly and creatively with broad audiences. We will host two sessions that introduce the basics of video-making to help LTER scientists gain confidence in using video to share their research in an engaging manner. No prior experience with outreach or video production is necessary. In Session 1, participants will be introduced to visual storytelling, developing a story arc, editing software, video and audio tips/tricks. Session 2 will build on material presented in the first Session and provide participants with hands-on training in low-cost filming and editing techniques to make their own short video (participants are encouraged to attend both sessions).

Speakers
Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office


Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

10:30am

Entering Mentoring Workshop (all day, preregistration required)
Limited Capacity seats available

This is an ALL DAY workshop. Only sign up if you intend to participate in the entire workshop.

Workshop Summary
2018 ASM Mentor Training Workshop participants will explore key aspects of effective mentoring practices, reflect on their own mentoring practices, and learn strategies to improve their practice. Mentoring competencies addressed in the workshop will include establishing and aligning expectations, effective communication, evaluating mentee understanding, promoting mentee independence, and working with mentees from diverse backgrounds. Each participant will draft and revise a mentoring philosophy and make plans to implement what they learned in the workshop.

 Additional Information:
The Entering Mentoring curriculum on which the workshop is based, is used in various formats by the Center for Improvement in Mentored Research Experiences. It  was originally published by J. Handelsman, C. Pfund, S.M. Lauffer, and C. Pribbe and was based on the Research Mentor Training Seminar curriculum originally developed by the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professors Program. A new version of Entering Mentoring was published in 2014 by W.H. Freeman and Co. By C. Pfund, J. Branchaw, and J. Handelsman.



Speakers
avatar for Janet Branchaw

Janet Branchaw

Director, WIScience, University of Wisconsin
Janet Branchaw is the Director of the Institute for Biology Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She earned her BS in Zoology from Iowa State University and her PhD in Physiology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After completing postdoctoral research training... Read More →



Monday October 1, 2018 10:30am - 5:30pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

12:00pm

1:30pm

Camera trapping for long-term monitoring of wildlife: Cross-network considerations
Our workshop will introduce wildlife camera trapping and other methods, including the logistical and experimental considerations required for different environmental contexts. This workshop will also facilitate collaboration among animal researchers across LTERs, and will provide an opportunity for scientists in other disciplines to learn how wildlife monitoring may improve interpretation of long-term research. We will present an overview of camera trap functionality, discuss how to adjust methods depending upon environmental characteristics, and introduce approaches for data analysis. We will also provide insight from the CAP LTER wildlife initiative on issues to consider when assessing wildlife communities across an urban gradient.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Katherine Weiss

Katherine Weiss

Ph.D. Student, Arizona State University

Co-organizers
avatar for Heather Bateman

Heather Bateman

Associate Professor, Arizona State University


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

1:30pm

Integrating stakeholder engagement and social science research within LTER
We will explore the role of social science within LTER as a means to advance the science of socio-ecological systems, include stakeholder engagement in the co-production of knowledge, and add value to stakeholder engagement efforts. A panel comprised of LTER scientists will share examples, highlighting contributions to advances in social-ecological science, exploring novel engagement and broader impacts efforts, and reflecting on some of the challenges of social science within LTER. Following the panel, a facilitated discussion will allow for shared reflections on the current state – and potential future – of integrated social science and stakeholder engagement initiatives across the LTER Network.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Julie Doll

Julie Doll

KBS LTER Education & Outreach Coordinator, Michigan State University

Co-organizers
MN

Michael Nelson

PI, Oregon State University


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

1:30pm

Interactions between LTER, NEON and CZO
This workshop will discuss the development of synergies between the US Long-term
Ecological Research (LTER), Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) and National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) programs , which rely on different, but complementary approaches to network-enabled science. LTER and CZO focus on long-term research projects aimed at understanding ecological pattern and process in a wide range of ecosystems, while NEON is a continental-scale observation facility designed to examine ecological change over time. Despite these differences, there are great potential synergies between LTER, CZO and NEON that are beginning to emerge across a range of research areas.  LTERand CZO observations, experiments, and comparative studies are providing theory, methods, and historical context, while NEON measurements provide standardization and broad scale coverage. Overall, NEON provides information on how ecosystems are changing, while LTER and CZO provide information on why these changes occur. There is a strong need to develop programs and agreements to foster the emergence of these synergies to further network science in support of resource management and environmental policy at local to global scales.

Lead Organizer
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Co-organizers
avatar for Sharon Collinge

Sharon Collinge

Director and Chief Scientist, National Ecological Observatory Network
Sharon Collinge was named Director and Chief Scientist at NEON in early 2018. She is a professor and former director of the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado Boulder. Sharon’s professional expertise centers on how landscape change affects the survival and... Read More →


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

1:30pm

Part 1 of 2: Developing Curricula with Inspiration from the Children's Book Series
This will be a full workshop run by two EOC members and two invited guests with deep experience in the development of curricula. The Children's Book Series will provide the platform for ideas on curricula that could be used in any school across the nation. Topics such as science, math, art, English, social studies, and even physical education will be addressed.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Jill Haukos

Jill Haukos

Director of Education, Kansas State University

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

1:30pm

Consortium on biogeochemical budgets and modeling across LTER sites
Biogeochemical research is being done at all of the LTER sites. Here we propose a workshop for the LTER All-Scientist meeting to promote collaboration. Specifically, we will explore opportunities for cross-site synthesis of data and models through establishing a consortium, which potentially becomes a long-term mechanism of exchanging ideas and promoting collaboration. We will work with scientists from various LTER sites to compile annual carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and water budgets (stocks and fluxes) for all the terrestrial LTER sites into a common format. We will then discuss ways of analyses of the compiled data. One product of the workshop is a model-based analysis of biogeochemical dynamics across the LTER network.

Lead Organizer
YL

Yiqi Luo

Professor, Northern Arizona University
Ecosystem ecologyBiogeochemistryCarbon cycle, nitrogen cycle,Ecological modeling

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

1:30pm

Interactions of Forest Insects and Pathogens with other Global Change Drivers
Forest insects and pathogens (FIPs) are a major global change driver (GCD) with significant ecological consequences. The character and magnitude of future FIP ecosystem impacts will depend on interactions with other GCDs (e.g. land use/climate change, air pollution, other FIPs). Due to their long-term measurements of forests and disturbance interactions, LTER scientists are uniquely positioned to describe the interactions of FIPs with other GCDs. Participants will contribute to a continental-scale synthesis describing the pathways, mechanisms, and consequences of these interactions. Our workshop will review the latest research, develop conceptual models of FIP/GCD interactions, and chart a course for future collaborative LTER research.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Meghan Graham MacLean

Meghan Graham MacLean

Research Associate/Post-doc, Harvard Forest, Harvard University

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
11. Sanderling Meeting Room

1:30pm

Making sense of soil organic matter: barriers and opportunities for cross-site synthesis
Synthesizing data across environmental gradients is essential for improving our understanding of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics and their corresponding representation in land models. However, the use of varied collection methods, analytical techniques, and data management practices present significant structural challenges to data synthesis efforts. During this workshop, the organizers will present and discuss details of their approach to a preliminary effort synthesizing cross-site soil data and the biogeochemical models that these data are intended to support. The workshop will feature a facilitated discussion of essential soil measurements for SOM studies and data management best practices to better support future syntheses.

Lead Organizer
LB

Laurel Brigham

University of Colorado, Boulder

Co-organizers
avatar for Derek Pierson

Derek Pierson

PhD Candidate, Oregon State University
avatar for Stevan Earl

Stevan Earl

Arizona State University


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

1:30pm

New methods to analyze community dynamics from observational or experimental studies
Univariate and multivariate methods are commonly used to explore the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecological communities. Both, however, have limitations, including oversimplification or abstraction of communities. Rank abundance curves potentially can integrate these existing methodologies. I have developed new methods for studying temporal changes and spatial differences in rank abundance curves and incorporated these metrics as functions in an update to the codyn R package. Preliminary investigations found that species reordering is potentially an understudied key determinant of community dynamics. This R package and the associated metrics utilizing rank abundance curves will enable researchers to further explore complexities in ecol

Lead Organizer
MA

Meghan Avolio

Johns Hopkins University

Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

1:30pm

Pelagic LTER sites: site overviews, intercomparisons and synthesis planning
The recent addition of two new pelagic ocean sites to the LTER network has doubled the representation of open ocean ecosystems within the network and opened up new opportunities for cross-site exchange and synthesis. This workshop will provide participants in both new and established pelagic ocean LTER sites an opportunity to exchange information and plan future synthesis activities. Presentations will include site overviews, and time will be devoted to more focused exchanges on specific topics including site physics, modeling, nutrient/micronutrient dynamics, primary and secondary production, grazing, export, higher trophic levels, and data management.

Lead Organizer
KB

Katherine Barbeau

UC San Diego/Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Co-organizers
avatar for Heidi Sosik

Heidi Sosik

Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
avatar for Oscar Schofield

Oscar Schofield

Professor, Rutgers University
I am a biological oceanographer interested how the physics and chemistry regulates ocean ecosystems, with a primary research focus on the physiology and ecology of phytoplankton. My research is conducted in a range of oceans from the rapidly warming/melting along the West Antarctic... Read More →
avatar for Russ Hopcroft

Russ Hopcroft

Professor, University of Alaska
My primary interests focus on the composition, production and energy flow of marine pelagic ecosystems using a combination of classical and modern tools, particularly in polar and sub-polar ecosystems, and how they respond to environmental variability.


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

1:30pm

Reproducible Data Visualization using Rmarkdown and ggplot2
Participants will use of Rmarkdown and ggplot2 to create document integrating R code, documentation and data visualization in compelling documents. The first half of the session will be focusing on an introduction to Rmarkdown and how this format can be used to make data processing and analysis more reproducible by combining, documentation and executable code chunks into one document, that can be rendered in different formats (html, PDF, …) to be shared. In the second half of this workshop, participants will take a deeper look into data visualization and how ggplot’s grammar of graphics approach can be used to conduct powerful data exploration and analysis visualizations. Basic knowledge of the R programming language recommended.

If you are planning to attend our workshop, please do the following:
  • Follow these instructions to prepare your computer before the session: README
  • Bring your laptop!

Lead Organizer
avatar for Julien Brun

Julien Brun

Scientific Programmer, NCEAS

Co-organizers
LH

Lauren Hallett

University of Oregon


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

1:30pm

Understanding and responding to extreme events in ecosystems and social-ecological-technical systems
The year 2017 was dubbed “The Year of Extreme Weather” (NPR 2017), with three major hurricanes making landfall in the United States, while drought prevailed and fires raged in California and the Southwest. In the Anthropocene, people and ecosystems are experiencing extreme weather-related events of increasing magnitude with increasing frequency. This changing landscape highlights an urgent need to bring clarity to understanding of extreme events and their impacts while also determining how best to respond to them. We aim to bring together social, ecological, and engineering perspectives on resilience with ecological perspectives on extreme events as they are represented among LTER sites working on (or experiencing) disturbance.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Nancy Grimm

Nancy Grimm

Professor, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences
The year 2017 was dubbed “The Year of Extreme Weather” (NPR 2017), with three major hurricanes making landfall in the United States, while drought prevailed and fires raged in California and the Southwest. In the Anthropocene, people and ecosystems are experiencing extreme weather-related... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University
avatar for Melinda Smith

Melinda Smith

Professor, Colorado State University


Monday October 1, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

3:00pm

Video Interviews with anyone in LTER etwork
We are available from 3-5pm Monday and Tuesday, and 9am-12pm Wed and Thurs, to record short interviews with anyone who is willing to speak about their work and interest in long-term research and education. Those who have already signed up take priority, but feel free to come at anytime during the window that we are available and interviews will be first come, first served (we plan to only take 5-10 min for each interview.) Thanks!

Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office


Monday October 1, 2018 3:00pm - 5:30pm
13. Surf and Sand Meeting Room

3:30pm

Are we what we eat everywhere? Cross-site research of aquatic food webs
Understanding whether food webs are resource- or predation-forced is a central question in ecology. It is generally assumed that bottom-up processes are the main processes that influence vertebrate population fluctuations. It is only when taxa composition and environmental conditions are just so that top-down processes dominate over space or time. However, causes for the variation within food webs is still not clear making it important to identify factors that contribute to that variation. We want to discuss ideas with other LTER aquatic scientists, and build on other cross-site aquatic studies, including LINX, NEON, and SCALER by thinking about the next LTER aquatic cross-site research initiative focused around aquatic food webs.

Lead Organizer
BP

Brooke Penaluna

PNW Research Station, USFS

Co-organizers
avatar for Sherri Johnson

Sherri Johnson

USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station


Monday October 1, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

3:30pm

Cultivating Diversity & Inclusion at LTER Sites
Using case studies from multiple sites, panelists will share creative pathways for addressing 3 major diversity issues faced by sites: broadening the diversity of students, enhancing staff diversity, and building a site community’s cultural competency. Some of the solutions we’ll discuss include pathways to 1) create a site diversity plan connected to a theory of institutional change; 2) frame funding requests and/or leverage institutional resources to provide cultural competence training; 3) improve job search and hiring practices; 4) partner with diversity-focused organizations (ESA-SEEDS, SACNAS, AISES), tribal colleges, HCBUs, and an LTER student alumni network to broaden applicant pools for student programming.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

Director of Outreach & Education, Harvard Forest, Harvard University
I'm broadly interested in science communication, undergraduate education, broadening diversity in the sciences, and - research-wise - invasive forest pests, athropod foodwebs, and marine mammal population dynamics (not necessarily at the same time).As co-chair of the LTER Communications... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz

Head of Education, The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
K-12 and Undergraduate Ecology EducationData Literacy in EcologyBuilding and nurturing a diverse community of scientists, educators and participants in LTERThe Undergraduate Field Experience Research Network (UFERN)The LTER REU Initiative


Monday October 1, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

3:30pm

Ecological stoichiometry through the lens of long-term data
The overarching theme of ecological stoichiometric theory is to understand the coupling of energy to nutrient biogeochemical cycles as mediated by the demands and constraints of homeostasis and thermodynamics. External drivers have the potential to influence ecosystem scale stoichiometry including, sea-level rise (coastal ecosystems), climatic variability, thawing of permafrost and increasing in ice-free days (Arctic ecosystems), altered fire frequency and patterns (forested ecosystems), lithology and critical zone structure, changes to upstream watersheds influencing timing and delivery of water and nutrients, invasive species, and ecosystem management. These drivers influence ecosystem biogeochemical cycling and productivity. Additional information for this workshop can be found on the LTER Ecological Stoichiometry GitHub repository (link).

Lead Organizer
avatar for Paul Julian

Paul Julian

University of Florida
Generally, I am an aquatic ecologist and biogeochemist studying soil and water column nutrients relative to internal and external driving forces from a local to global scale. While I enjoy studying all aquatic systems (i.e. lakes, rivers, wetlands, estuaries, etc.), I am passionate... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University


Monday October 1, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

3:30pm

Part 2 of 2: Developing Curricula with Inspiration from the Children's Book Series
This will be a full workshop run by two EOC members and two invited guests with deep experience in the development of curricula. The Children's Book Series will provide the platform for ideas on curricula that could be used in any school across the nation. Topics such as science, math, art, English, social studies, and even physical education will be addressed.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Jill Haukos

Jill Haukos

Director of Education, Kansas State University

Co-organizers

Monday October 1, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

5:00pm

Poster Session A
Posters will be hanging throughout the meeting in Fred Farr Forum and the Kiln Meeting Room. Presenters will be present at their posters and drinks and refreshments will be available at 5 pm on Monday (poster session A-including all site posters) and 5 pm on Tuesday (poster session B-including all REU posters).

6:30pm

7:30pm

Idea Cafe
Limited Capacity seats available

On Monday evening, October 1st, we invite you to join us in the first-ever LTER Idea Cafe. Think Barroom napkin meets PechaKucha. Toss in a bit of Story Collider or poetry slam if you’re really ambitious.
What is it?
Each participant will get 3 minutes--with or without slides--to tell an audience of LTER colleagues about an idea that really capitalizes on the opportunity presented by the nearly 40 years of LTER Network science. The venue will be relaxed, laid back, with drinks and snacks available. The pitch might involve a theory that you think could be tested with LTER data or a new kind of cross-site experiment. Maybe it’s a clever way of connecting LTER science with users…or something we don’t even know we might need yet.

There’s no need to have all the details worked out. Just tell the story of what inspired you or made you curious, what the idea is, and why it’s a fit for LTER.

Who’s eligible?
Anyone. Students, Staff, Postdocs, people who have spent their whole careers with the Network and those who have just arrived.




How do I put my idea in the hat?
Submit a title and a 1-2 sentence description of your idea on the form below. The organizing committee will select up to 15 people to present their ideas on Monday evening. They will aim for an interesting cross-section of approaches, career stages, and perspectives.

Submit here, by September 10.





What happens to the ideas?
That kind of depends how inspired the audience gets. You might find colleagues to put together a working group or a proposal. The Science Council or the Network Communications Office might get excited about an idea and put their shoulder to the wheel alongside yours. Or your friends will give you a high-five and move on. But it’s all part of the fun.

Ideas must be submitted by September 10 and presenters will be notified by September 21.

Monday October 1, 2018 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Seascape Dining Room
 
Tuesday, October 2
 

7:30am

8:30am

Plenary 2: Michael Dietze / Sharon Collinge
8:30-8:40 Brief Announcements

8:40-9:20 a.m.
Sharon Collinge, National Ecological Observatory Network, Director and Chief Scientist
Sharon Collinge was named Director and Chief Scientist at NEON in early 2018. She is a professor and former director of the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado Boulder. Sharon’s professional expertise centers on how landscape change affects the survival and persistence of native plants and animals. Her current research focuses on the use of ecological theory to guide efforts to conserve and restore vernal pool ecosystems in California. At CU-Boulder, Sharon has taught courses in Conservation Biology, Food and the Environment, Disease Ecology, and Restoration Ecology. Sharon earned a doctorate in landscape ecology from Harvard University in 1995, and in 1998 she became an assistant professor of biology and environmental studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder. Sharon was named a 2004 Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in recognition of her outstanding leadership ability and desire to communicate scientific issues beyond academic audiences, and was elected as the Ecological Society of America’s Vice President for Public Affairs in 2011.

9:20-10:00 a.m.
Michael Dietze, Boston University, Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environment
Michael Dietze leads the Ecological Forecasting Laboratory at Boston University, whose mission is to better understand and predict ecological systems, and is author of the book “Ecological Forecasting”. He is interested in the ways that iterative forecasts, which are continually confronted with new data, can improve and accelerate basic science in ecology, while at the same time making that science more directly relevant to society. Much of the current work in the lab is organized within the Near-term Ecological Forecasting Initiative (NEFI) and the PEcAn project. NEFI is focused on addressing overarching questions about ecological predictability, while developing forecasts for a wide range of ecological processes (vegetation phenology and land-surface fluxes; ticks, tick-borne disease and small mammal hosts; soil microbiome; aquatic productivity and algal blooms) and advancing statistical and informatic tools for ecological forecasting. PEcAn is focused on the terrestrial carbon cycle, improving our capacity for carbon MRV (monitoring, reporting, verification), forecasting, data assimilation, and multi-model benchmarking and calibration within the land component of Earth System models.



Speakers
avatar for Sharon Collinge

Sharon Collinge

Director and Chief Scientist, National Ecological Observatory Network
Sharon Collinge was named Director and Chief Scientist at NEON in early 2018. She is a professor and former director of the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado Boulder. Sharon’s professional expertise centers on how landscape change affects the survival and... Read More →
avatar for Michael Dietze

Michael Dietze

Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University
Michael Dietze leads the Ecological Forecasting Laboratory at Boston University, whose mission is to better understand and predict ecological systems, and is author of the book “Ecological Forecasting”. He is interested in the ways that iterative forecasts, which are continually... Read More →


Tuesday October 2, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
02. Merrill Hall Asilomar Conference Grounds

10:30am

Coming to a Computing Consensus: Tools for Successful Collaborations in Broad-Scale Ecology
As web technology has permeated our lives, ecology has evolved from a field of siloed research to one of synthesis and scaling. Ecology at scale requires an emphasis on project management (PM) to coordinate teams, data, and analysis over space and time. Yet researchers rarely receive formal training in PM skills and tools. We will discuss web-enabled PM tools inspired by distributed software development communities and illustrate how web connectivity can drive both bigger ecology, and new approaches to collaboration and discovery. Participants will reflect on past collaborations and work through a consensus-building exercise to develop guidelines for future collaboration, and leave with a renewed toolkit of web-based PM tools.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Braeden Van Deynze

Braeden Van Deynze

Michigan State University
I'm an agricultural economist who studies trade-offs between ecosystem services in agroecosystems. My research is focused on weed and insect control in row crops.

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

10:30am

Contributions of Long Term Ecological Research to Changing Theoretical Paradigms of Disturbance Ecol
Over the last several decades, disturbance has become a commonly recognized driver of the dynamics of ecological systems. Long-term ecological research is uniquely positioned to address the three challenges of disturbance: (1) that events can be both positive and negative, (2) that theoretically frameworks are comprehensive enough for driving empirical generality, and (3) that disturbance can alter systems differently as environments change. This session will review examples of how LTER has advanced understanding of disturbance, work through a refined theoretical framework for improving synthesis of disturbance across different types of systems, and contribute toward a publication that highlights the value of long-term research in

Lead Organizer
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University

Co-organizers
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

10:30am

Engaging LTER Scientists and Educators in Cross-Site Undergraduate Research
Ecology is an increasingly collaborative endeavor; the next generation of LTER scientists need experience working across sites. How can LTER sites leverage REU and other Undergraduate Research Experiences (URE) programs to further network-based inquiry? Come hear from mentors and students about the outcomes of a cross-site project. Then, participate in theme-based round-table discussions for researchers to forge collaborative URE projects, while education professionals discuss cross-site program development. The goal for the 2019 field season is to facilitate the development of 3-5 cross-site URE projects. The long-term goals are to refine the research/education model, and to seek funding to build a sustained cross-LTER URE program.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Audrey Barker-Plotkin

Audrey Barker-Plotkin

Harvard Forest, Harvard University

Co-organizers
avatar for Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz

Head of Education, The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
K-12 and Undergraduate Ecology EducationData Literacy in EcologyBuilding and nurturing a diverse community of scientists, educators and participants in LTERThe Undergraduate Field Experience Research Network (UFERN)The LTER REU Initiative
avatar for Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

Director of Outreach & Education, Harvard Forest, Harvard University
I'm broadly interested in science communication, undergraduate education, broadening diversity in the sciences, and - research-wise - invasive forest pests, athropod foodwebs, and marine mammal population dynamics (not necessarily at the same time).As co-chair of the LTER Communications... Read More →
JJ

Julia Jones

Professor, Oregon State University
avatar for Julie Doll

Julie Doll

KBS LTER Education & Outreach Coordinator, Michigan State University


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

10:30am

Evaluating the influence of predator risk effects on ecological processes across multiple scales
The capability of predators to generate behaviorally mediated indirect interactions via predation risk has been demonstrated in many ecosystems, as have multiple mechanisms responsible for such effects. However, a general framework predicting the ecological impacts of predation risk remains elusive. Barriers to such a framework include difficulty in predicting contexts under which predation risk is a dominant driver of ecosystem structure and function, as well as a limited understanding of how the role of predation risk changes across scales. Overcoming these barriers are essential to predicting the effects of predators (or their absence) in ecosystems.

Lead Organizer
RN

Rob Nowicki

Mote Marine Laboratory

Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

10:30am

Integrating population and community synchrony across LTER sites
Fluctuations in the abundance of populations – either of a single species across spatially disjunct locations, or of multiple species within a single location – are often correlated through time. Despite conceptual similarities, these two types of synchrony— population and community synchrony, respectively— have been studied as separate processes. The LTER synchrony working group has been integrating methodologies from these two branches of research to better understand patterns and drivers of synchrony and its effects on stability. We focus on methods to assess the temporal and spatial scales of synchrony. The goal of this workshop is to share these methods, and to work with new collaborators to apply them to new questions and datasets.

Lead Organizer
LH

Lauren Hallett

University of Oregon

Co-organizers
LG

Laureano Gherardi

Postdoc, Arizona State University
avatar for Max Castorani

Max Castorani

Assistant Professor, University of Virginia


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

10:30am

Semantic Approaches to Improving LTER Data Discovery and Interoperability: A Panel Discussion
Search and browse capabilities are essential for data discoverability. These functions are enhanced by the use of semantic tools that promote consistent and efficient searches. This session is intended to educate the US information management and researcher community about the capabilities and goals of controlled vocabularies, thesauri, and ontologies. We hope to determine if there are potential cross-cutting or synergistic activities that could help promote data discoverability. We will have a panel of three: John Porter (VCR LTER) will discuss the US LTER Controlled Vocabulary, Barbara Magagna (Environment Agency Austria) will discuss Envthes, and Pier Luigi Buttigieg (Jacobs University Bremen, Germany) will discuss the ENVO ontology.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Kristin Vanderbilt

Kristin Vanderbilt

Research Associate Professor, University of New Mexico

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 1 of 2: Droughts and deluges: Impacts on ecosystem structure and function
This is part 1 of a 2-part, 180-minute session. Since the 1990’s, climate scientists have forecasted a future of more frequent droughts and deluges as the hydrological cycle intensifies. Yet our understanding of the impacts of these precipitation extremes remains largely anecdotal, and we lack a foundational perspective of their ecological consequences. This workshop will explore and synthesize knowledge of ecological responses to droughts and deluges from across the LTER network. We will compile observations gleaned from more than three decades of monitoring, as well as results from precipitation experiments focused on extremes. An ASM workshop is an ideal venue to begin synthesizing knowledge and data from across the LTER Network.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Melinda Smith

Melinda Smith

Professor, Colorado State University

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 1 of 2: Organic matter synthesis: patterns, trends, processes, and fluxes across the LTER network
This is part 1 of a 2-part (180-minute) session. Storage of organic matter in ecosystems provides a critical climate-regulating service. Observations from myriad ecosystems suggest that the drivers of organic matter dynamics and the magnitudes of pools and fluxes are changing. The LTER network is poised to provide answers to questions of critical relevance to society regarding patterns in organic matter storage. Answers to such questions require analyses of long-term trends in pools and fluxes, spatial distribution, and the processes contributing to preservation, transformation, and transport of organic matter. We propose to assemble descriptions of organic matter pools, processes, and fluxes across the LTER network. We will summarize the state of organic matter research in the network, i

Lead Organizer
TH

Tamara Harms

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Co-organizers
avatar for Michelle Mack

Michelle Mack

Professor, Northern Arizona University
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 2 of 2: Climate Change at LTER Sites
This is part 2 of  a 2-part, 180-minute workshop.  As at 2012 and 2015 ASMs, participating sites will present their current understanding of how climate is changing and how the ecosystem has responded at that site. We will examine forcing (i.e., temperature, precipitation); geophysical responses (e.g., ice, snow, permafrost, streamflow, sea or lake level, upwelling, drought); and responses in LTER core areas (organic matter, inorganic cycling, trophic relationships, primary productivity, disturbances). Reports in 2015 from 25 sites indicated widespread changes in phase and timing of water; hypoxia, acidification, salinity; changes in C and N; pests and diseases, mortality, migration, loss of habitat connectivity; and altered disturbance (wildfire, cyclones). (This is part 2 of a 2-part workshop.)

Lead Organizer
JJ

Julia Jones

Professor, Oregon State University

Co-organizers
avatar for Art Miller

Art Miller

Research Oceanographer, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Art Miller is a Research Oceanographer (equivalent to Full Professor) and a Senior Lecturer in Climate Sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD). He is also currently Head of the Oceans and Atmosphere Section, which includes the CASPO Division and MPL. He is a physical... Read More →
DH

David Hondula

Arizona State University
JC

John Campbell

USDA Forest Service
TH

Teehee Hwang

Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

10:30am

Part 2 of 2: Ecological Connectivity in a Changing World: An LTER Synthesis
This is part 2 of a 2-part (180-minute) session. The concept of ecological connectivity is central to the hypotheses at many LTER sites. The application of the concept may differ across LTER studies, with some focusing on hydrologic connectivity and others focusing on population connectivity. This breadth of understanding across the LTER sites allows for a unique contribution on the importance of ecological connectivity. In some contexts, connectivity may exacerbate instability, while in other contexts it may enhance ecosystem resilience. The goal of this workshop is to synthesize the findings and predictions related to ecological connectivity across LTER sites. We invite participants from all sites, especially those who use the concept of connectivity as part of their hypotheses. (This is part 2 of a 2-part workshop.)

Lead Organizer
avatar for Ruth Heindel

Ruth Heindel

University of Colorado Boulder, INSTAAR

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

10:30am

Part 2 of 2: How to Use Video Storytelling to Share Your Science
Short videos have become an accessible and popular way to share scientific information clearly and creatively with broad audiences. We will host two sessions that introduce the basics of video-making to help LTER scientists gain confidence in using video to share their research in an engaging manner. No prior experience with outreach or video production is necessary. In Session 1, participants will be introduced to visual storytelling, editing software, video and audio tips/tricks. Session 2 will build on material presented in the first Session and provide participants with additional advice and hands-on training in low-cost filming and editing techniques (participants are encouraged to attend both sessions).

Speakers
Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office


Tuesday October 2, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

12:00pm

1:30pm

Build Your Own Engagement Plan for Science Impact
You’ve crafted compelling messages and rocked your media interview, now what? If you’ve wondered what else you can do to ensure your science has impact or if you’re are curious about why outreach programs are shifting from “communication” to “engagement”, join this workshop to learn more. Attendees will: (1) learn about how strategic engagement can boost the impact of site science, and (2) participate in a series of exercises to build your own engagement strategy for science impact. Teams of 2 or more people from a site are highly encouraged. This workshop draws on the NSF AISL grant PES@LTERs. Participants are encouraged to also attend the roundtable discussion, “Shaping the Future of Public Engagement with Science at LTERs”.

Lead Organizer
KF

Kathy Fallon Lambert

Science Policy Exchange

Co-organizers
avatar for John Besley

John Besley

Ellis N. Brandt Chair, Michigan State University
I study public opinion about science and scientists' opinions about the public. My goal is to improve the effectiveness of science communication by helping science communicators be more strategic. That means figuring out what you want (goals) and then figuring out what you can communicate... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Garlick

Sarah Garlick

Director of Science Policy and Outreach, Hubbard Brook Research Foundation


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

1:30pm

Data preparation for synthesis - reuse scripts, collaborate, learn
Ecologists and data managers write significant amounts of code for data manipulation in preparation for publication and analysis. However, publishing and sharing this code is not a common practice and is hampered by the lack of thematic code registries that are designed to make code easily discoverable and reusable. In this session we will introduce a new data preparation code registry that has recently been established. It’s focus is on code or workflow scripts developed for common procedures ecologists and information managers encounter when organizing, cleaning, manipulating, and harmonizing data. It will live in the niche between scientific analysis and modeling code and short code snippets found on online community help boards.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Kristin Vanderbilt

Kristin Vanderbilt

Research Associate Professor, University of New Mexico

Co-organizers
avatar for Colin Smith

Colin Smith

Information Manager, Environmental Data Initiative


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

1:30pm

Ecological autocatalysis: what is it and how can we test it?
There is renewed interest in understanding feedbacks and circular interactions in biological systems. These feedbacks and interactions include vital processes such as cycling of nutrients, species-environment interactions (e.g., soil formation) etc. These 'self-reinforcing' circular interactions have been likened to autocatalytic reactions chemistry wherein one species produces the resources required by the next in a loop. A recent review (Veldhuis et al. 2018 Ecological Monographs) suggests that such interactions can arise through a mix of competition and natural selection, form the backbone of ecosystem organization and ecosystem properties such as nutrient cycling in fact emerge from these. How can we test this idea in real ecosystem?

Lead Organizer
MK

Mayank Kohli

University of Minnesota

Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

1:30pm

Harmonizing ecological community survey data for reuse
Long-term data are highly important for synthesis research, but we know from experience that original, primary research datasets cannot be synthesized until all data are understood and converted to a similar format. This session will introduce EDI’s work harmonizing data from diverse ecological community surveys into a standard, flexible template, and its use by the NEON project and LTER synthesis working groups. We will present our experiences reformatting community survey datasets and performing synthesis research with these products. We will follow with discussion and a hands-on session covering conversion of data, the use converted datasets with EDI’s R tools, or other aspects of time-series management.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara

Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

1:30pm

Innovative Strategies for Microclimate Monitoring and Modeling
Variability in microclimate conditions within LTER sites is among the important drivers of ecological and human outcomes. Conversely, microclimate conditions are in part an outcome of the structure and composition of the landscape. This workshop will explore techniques in use across the LTER network to monitor and model microclimates. Particular attention will be given to the deployment of emerging low-cost technologies and associated challenges in natural and urban landscapes including siting, shielding, validation, and quality control.

Lead Organizer
DH

David Hondula

Arizona State University

Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

1:30pm

Integration of Environmental Sciences, Arts, and Humanities Across the LTER Network
The integration of environmental science, arts, and humanities (eSAH) is flourishing across the LTER network, where it is being applied to enhance outreach/education activities as well as fundamental inquiry with the aspirational goal of helping society overcome the social-ecological grand challenges of today. During this workshop, we will: a) share examples of varying eSAH activities from across the LTER network through brief presentations from artists, scientists, and organizers, b) report on research assessing the impacts of eSAH activities on audiences and their value to LTER, c) analyze the range and extent of interdisciplinary integration currently being achieved through different programmatic models, and d) develop an action plan for

Lead Organizer
avatar for Mary Beth Leigh

Mary Beth Leigh

Professor of Microbiology, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Mary Beth Leigh is a Professor of Microbiology in the Institute of Arctic Biology and the Department of Biology & Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She organizes Alaska-based and LTER-wide efforts to foster collaboration between the environmental sciences, arts, and... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

Director of Outreach & Education, Harvard Forest, Harvard University
I'm broadly interested in science communication, undergraduate education, broadening diversity in the sciences, and - research-wise - invasive forest pests, athropod foodwebs, and marine mammal population dynamics (not necessarily at the same time).As co-chair of the LTER Communications... Read More →
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University
MN

Michael Nelson

PI, Oregon State University
NO

Nick Oehm

Education & Outreach Coordinator, Florida International University


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

1:30pm

LTER Synthesis Research and Training through Distributed Graduate Seminars
The NCO is able to fund one distributed graduate seminar (DGS) during the 2018-19 Academic year. The purpose of this workshop is to briefly explain the purpose and design of an NCO-supported DGS, and explore potential timely topics and cross-campus and cross-site collaborations. Because the NCO can only fund one DGS we will not be issuing a call for proposals. We hope to use this workshop to spark interest and elicit ideas and will follow up with participating sites immediately following the ASM.

Lead Organizer
FD

Frank Davis

Executive Director, LTER-Network Communications Office
Dr. Frank Davis has primary responsibility for the NCO’s successful operation and works with LTER and NSF leadership to ensure that the NCO meets the needs of LTER sites. A biogeographer with extensive experience in scientific synthesis, Frank served as founding Deputy Director... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for Marty Downs

Marty Downs

Deputy Director, LTER Network-NCO


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

1:30pm

Species diversity and climate-mediated interactions between plants and their enemies/mutualists
Differences in climate may maintain or erode local and/or regional plant species diversity by influencing interactions between plants and their natural enemies/mutualists. The goal of this workshop is to bring together LTER scientists to develop coordinated experiments and observational studies to test if differences in climate alter the strength of interactions between plants and their natural enemies (e.g. fungal pathogens, bacteria, insects) and/or mutualists (e.g. mycorrhizae, pollinators) and if these climate-mediated interactions determine differences in plant species diversity. This workshop will bring together LTER ecologists to draft standardized protocols to address these questions across a wide range of ecosystems.

Lead Organizer
JL

Joseph LaManna

Marquette University

Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

1:30pm

The biogeochemical effects of predation: synthesis and direction for ecological prediction
Top-down forces of predators through consumption, injury, and risk effects are well-studied. Emerging evidence demonstrates that predators have the potential for bottom-up effects through nutrient regeneration, matter transport, and physical habitat alteration. However, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the potential feedbacks of these roles and their effect on our ability to predict the structure and function of ecological systems. 1) How might predators influence biochemical processes; 2) What might be the scale and impact of these changes on community structure and ecosystem function; 3) How do these effects interact with their roles as consumers?

Lead Organizer
BS

Bradley Strickland

PhD Candidate, Florida International University

Co-organizers
MH

Michael Heithaus

Dean, Florida International University


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

1:30pm

Part 2 of 2: Droughts and deluges: Impacts on ecosystem structure and function
This is part 2 of a 2-part, 180-minute session. Since the 1990’s, climate scientists have forecasted a future of more frequent droughts and deluges as the hydrological cycle intensifies. Yet our understanding of the impacts of these precipitation extremes remains largely anecdotal, and we lack a foundational perspective of their ecological consequences. This workshop will explore and synthesize knowledge of ecological responses to droughts and deluges from across the LTER network. We will compile observations gleaned from more than three decades of monitoring, as well as results from precipitation experiments focused on extremes. An ASM workshop is an ideal venue to begin synthesizing knowledge and data from across the LTER Network.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Melinda Smith

Melinda Smith

Professor, Colorado State University

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

1:30pm

Part 2 of 2: Organic matter synthesis: patterns, trends, processes, and fluxes across the LTER network
This is part 2 of a 2-part (180-minute) session. Storage of organic matter in ecosystems provides a critical climate-regulating service. Observations from myriad ecosystems suggest that the drivers of organic matter dynamics and the magnitudes of pools and fluxes are changing. The LTER network is poised to provide answers to questions of critical relevance to society regarding patterns in organic matter storage. Answers to such questions require analyses of long-term trends in pools and fluxes, spatial distribution, and the processes contributing to preservation, transformation, and transport of organic matter. We propose to assemble descriptions of organic matter pools, processes, and fluxes across the LTER network. We will summarize the state of organic matter research in the network, i

Lead Organizer
TH

Tamara Harms

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Co-organizers
avatar for Michelle Mack

Michelle Mack

Professor, Northern Arizona University
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

1:30pm

Video Interviews with anyone in LTER etwork
Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office


Tuesday October 2, 2018 1:30pm - 5:30pm
13. Surf and Sand Meeting Room

3:30pm

Diversity Committee Meeting
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

3:30pm

ILTER Committee Meeting (newcomers welcome)
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Speakers
WM

William McDowell

University of New Hampshire
TT

Tiffany Troxler

Director of Science, Sea Level Solutions Center, Florida International University


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

3:30pm

LTER-CZO-NEON Follow up
Optional discussion time for follow-up on Monday afternoon session

Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

3:30pm

NGA
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Speakers
avatar for Russ Hopcroft

Russ Hopcroft

Professor, University of Alaska
My primary interests focus on the composition, production and energy flow of marine pelagic ecosystems using a combination of classical and modern tools, particularly in polar and sub-polar ecosystems, and how they respond to environmental variability.


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

3:30pm

NSF 101 for Early Career Scientists
NSF program officers Dan Thornhill (GEO) and Collete St. Mary (BIO) will be available to provide an introduction to NSF structure and processes and answer questions.  The session will be most appropriate for early career scientists, but all are welcome.

Speakers
DT

Dan Thornhill

National Science Foundation


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

3:30pm

Practicing uncertainty
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Speakers
RY

Ruth Yanai

SUNY-ESF


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

3:30pm

Soil Organic Matter Vocabulary discussion
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Co-organizers
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara
avatar for Mark Schildhauer

Mark Schildhauer

Senior Fellow, and Director of Computing (ret.), NCEAS/UCSB
Data semantics, Ecoinformatics training, Arctic data, LTER data, Ecological synthesis
avatar for Stevan Earl

Stevan Earl

Arizona State University


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

3:30pm

Arts and Humanities Follow-up Discussion
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Speakers
avatar for Mary Beth Leigh

Mary Beth Leigh

Professor of Microbiology, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Mary Beth Leigh is a Professor of Microbiology in the Institute of Arctic Biology and the Department of Biology & Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She organizes Alaska-based and LTER-wide efforts to foster collaboration between the environmental sciences, arts, and... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for Mary Beth Leigh

Mary Beth Leigh

Professor of Microbiology, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Mary Beth Leigh is a Professor of Microbiology in the Institute of Arctic Biology and the Department of Biology & Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She organizes Alaska-based and LTER-wide efforts to foster collaboration between the environmental sciences, arts, and... Read More →


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

3:30pm

GIS working group - brain storming new visions
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 


Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

3:30pm

IM Vocabulary Working Group and Guests: Collaboration Discussion
Lead Organizer
avatar for Kristin Vanderbilt

Kristin Vanderbilt

Research Associate Professor, University of New Mexico

Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

3:30pm

LTER DEIMS Ad hoc meeting
This ad hoc meeting is open to LTER DEIMS working group members only. We will focus on ongoing DEIMS activities related to LTER Information Management at the network level.

Lead Organizer
YX

Yang Xia

Kansas State University, Konza Prairie LTER

Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
11. Sanderling Meeting Room

3:30pm

OCE-funded PIs and Program Officers
If your group (ad hoc committee or synthesis working group) needs a meeting space with AV during this time slot, please contact Marty Downs (downs@nceas.ucsb.edu) and we can assign one.  For smaller groups and those not requiring projection, the venue has ample indoor and outdoor meeting spaces that do not require reservations. 

Tuesday October 2, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

5:00pm

Poster Session B
Posters will be hanging throughout the meeting in Fred Farr Forum and the Kiln Meeting Room. Presenters will be present at their posters and drinks and refreshments will be available at 5 pm on Monday (poster session A-including all site posters) and 5 pm on Tuesday (poster session B-including all REU posters).

6:30pm

7:00pm

Communication Committee Meeting – Newcomers Welcome!
Speakers
avatar for Julie Doll

Julie Doll

KBS LTER Education & Outreach Coordinator, Michigan State University
avatar for Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

Director of Outreach & Education, Harvard Forest, Harvard University
I'm broadly interested in science communication, undergraduate education, broadening diversity in the sciences, and - research-wise - invasive forest pests, athropod foodwebs, and marine mammal population dynamics (not necessarily at the same time).As co-chair of the LTER Communications... Read More →


Tuesday October 2, 2018 7:00pm - 8:30pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

7:30pm

Grad Student Trivia Night
Co-organizers

Tuesday October 2, 2018 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Britannia Arms Pub 444 Alvarado St, Monterey, CA 93940
 
Wednesday, October 3
 

7:30am

8:30am

Plenary 3: Matt Kirwan/Ben Halpern
8:30 a.m. Brief Announcements

8:40 a.m.-9:20 a.m.
Mathew Kirwan, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Assistant Professor

As an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Sciences at VIMS, Dr. Kirwan integrates studies on how coupled physical, biological, and anthropogenic processes influence the formation and survival of large scale landscapes, and patterns of response to climate change. He works mainly in salt marshes and other coastal environments, where knowledge of these ecogeomorphic feedbacks is often important for human welfare and ecosystem management. Kirwan’s work currently focuses on applying concepts of ecogeomorphology to better understand: 1) carbon-climate feedbacks in the coastal zone, 2) the response of wetlands to sea level rise, enhanced CO2, and elevated temperatures, and 3) how humans influence wetlands through upland land use change and its effect on wetland migration and sediment delivery to the coast.

9:20-10:00 a.m.
  • Ben Halpern, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Ben Halpern, Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
As Director of NCEAS, Dr. Halpern oversees a number of solutions-oriented projects based on synthesis science that integrate multiple datasets to answer big-picture ecological questions. He is a professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and Director of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning (CMAP) at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Halpern has led several broad research programs including a global synthesis of where marine protected areas (MPAs) meet conservation and fisheries objectives, a range of reproducible science initiatives, and and development and global application of the Ocean Health Index.




Speakers
avatar for Ben Halpern

Ben Halpern

Director, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
As Director of NCEAS, Dr. Halpern oversees a number of solutions-oriented projects based on synthesis science that integrate multiple datasets to answer big-picture ecological questions. He is a professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and Director of the... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Kirwan

Matthew Kirwan

Assistant Professor, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
As an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Sciences at VIMS, Dr. Kirwan integrates studies on how coupled physical, biological, and anthropogenic processes influence the formation and survival of large scale landscapes, and patterns of response to climate change. He works... Read More →


Wednesday October 3, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
02. Merrill Hall Asilomar Conference Grounds

10:00am

Video Interviews with anyone in LTER Network
Co-organizers
SN

Sam Norlin

LTER Network Communications Office


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:00am - 5:00pm
13. Surf and Sand Meeting Room

10:30am

Better Monitoring through Uncertainty Analysis: Optimize allocation of effort, save time and money
Periodic evaluation of monitoring programs is important to accommodate changing objectives, technological advances, and the accumulation of information over time. Uncertainty analysis can provide a basis for making difficult decisions about reducing or redirecting sampling effort, as will be illustrated in case studies involving mercury contamination in fish and loons, measurement uncertainty in forest inventory (FIA), and the number and placement of precipitation gauges at Hubbard Brook. Please come to learn about and discuss what analyses to use in which circumstances and how they might be applied at your site. Visit the QUEST (Quantifying Uncertainty in Ecosystem Studies) website for more information: www.quantifyinguncertainty.org

Lead Organizer
RY

Ruth Yanai

SUNY-ESF

Co-organizers
JC

John Campbell

USDA Forest Service


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

10:30am

Bottom-up networks and the LTER: Current and future initiatives
This workshop will provide an overview of bottom-up (grassroots) networks that build upon the LTER Network. Two bottom-up networks will be highlighted: the Nutrient Network (NutNet) and the Drought-Net International Drought Experiment (IDE). We will provide an overview of their origins and their current status. The remainder of the workshop will be devoted to brainstorming new bottom-up network initiatives that can leverage the LTER and other existing networks and discuss the costs and benefits of network science.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Melinda Smith

Melinda Smith

Professor, Colorado State University

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

10:30am

Developing a Website for LTER Methods
There are countless lab and field protocols used at LTER sites. Sometimes we would like a website like there are for cooking recipes - where we can upload a protocol, post reviews, subscribe to a section, or discuss issues. With an impressive-collective effort to publish the Standard Soil Methods for LTER book, there is potential to build from this book and share more cross-site methods 20 years later. In this workshop, we will first discuss if a website would be a helpful medium to share methods. If there is interest in developing a website, we would like to create a list of characteristics, disciplines, and sections the website should contain. Furthermore, we could brainstorm potential strategies to go about designing a website.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Kate Glanville

Kate Glanville

Graduate Student, Michigan State University

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

10:30am

Differential Impacts of the Anthropocene on Protected vs. Unprotected Areas
Humans have altered the planet in possibly irreversible ways, prompting the idea of the Anthropocene. There are both indirect and direct effects of the Anthropocene on the environment. Indirect effects (e.g., increased greenhouse gases) can affect protected and unprotected areas. However, direct effects (e.g., overfishing) can be prevented in protected areas. This workshop will discuss the hypothesis that protected areas are more resistant/resilient to anthropogenic forces than unprotected areas because they do not experience as many direct human effects. As many LTER sites are protected, we will explore available data to assess the differential impacts of the Anthropocene on protected vs. unprotected areas in a variety of ecosystems.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Carissa Gervasi

Carissa Gervasi

PhD Student, Florida International University

Co-organizers
avatar for Aaron Hogan

Aaron Hogan

PhD Student, Florida International University


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

10:30am

Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics: Research in Marine LTERs
A growing awareness of the important feedbacks that occur between ecological and evolutionary processes in ecosystems (eco-evolutionary dynamics - EED) has recently opened many ecologists’ eyes to the possibility of observing how rapid evolution could change ecosystems on observable times scales. With LTER investigators being uniquely positioned to address EED due to long term data collection at study sites, we will 1) present eco-evolutionary studies that are either on-going or emerging at marine LTERs, and 2) examine the benefits of long-term measurements to examine evolutionary change. We hope to provide a horizon scan of how the study of eco-evolutionary dynamics might be a new and important direction in long term ecological research.

Lead Organizer
GH

Gretchen Hofmann

Professor, UC Santa Barbara

Co-organizers
TR

Tatiana Rynearson

Professor, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

10:30am

Exploring the concept and utility of an “ecosystem reanalysis” product with LTER data
Reanalysis allows data to inform models through statistical techniques, which in turn, can elucidate underlying system dynamics to understand ecosystem function or improve forecasting at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Reanalysis are commonly used in the atmospheric community as a method to obtain insights that would be difficult, if not impossible, to obtain with observation alone. Reanalysis are uncommon in ecology, somewhat due to a lack of spatial and temporal data to assimilate into model frameworks. The LTER network has strengths in collecting rich and diverse long-term datasets, but synthesizing such datasets across networks or ecosystem is often challenging. With respect to this, synthesizing these data with an ecosystem

Lead Organizer
avatar for Adrian Rocha

Adrian Rocha

University of Notre Dame

Co-organizers
avatar for Michael Dietze

Michael Dietze

Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University
Michael Dietze leads the Ecological Forecasting Laboratory at Boston University, whose mission is to better understand and predict ecological systems, and is author of the book “Ecological Forecasting”. He is interested in the ways that iterative forecasts, which are continually... Read More →
YL

Yiqi Luo

Professor, Northern Arizona University
Ecosystem ecologyBiogeochemistryCarbon cycle, nitrogen cycle,Ecological modeling


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

10:30am

Identifying trends in nitrogen cycling across LTER sites controlled by local and regional factors
We are interested in leveraging LTER datasets on nitrogen process rates, stocks, and fluxes to ask questions about local versus regional controls on nitrogen cycling. We invite members from all LTER sites to discuss available nitrogen datasets from each site and discuss questions that can be addressed through a synthesis. Some potential questions include: (1) How do regional (climate, atmospheric deposition, NPP) versus local (disturbance, patch type) controls influence the nitrogen cycling and stocks and (2) How does the magnitude and location of nitrogen cycling hotspots differ across LTER sites? The goal of the workshop is to develop questions and hypotheses, identify datasets, and formulate sub-working groups to conduct the analyses.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Amalia Handler

Amalia Handler

PhD Candidate, Arizona State University
Grimm Lab student, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, stream networks, and fun with nitrogen!

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

10:30am

Making Your Data Work Harder: Using Shared Data to Enhance Your Research
The availability of shared data presents new opportunities for scientific discovery. This session has as its objective helping researchers to realize those opportunities. It will include a brief tutorial on how to more effectively and efficiently locate data, and how to use code-generation services to accelerate analysis. That will be followed by real-world examples of data synthesis with a panel drawn from LTER Synthesis Working Groups.

Participants in the workshop discussion will have the opportunity to consider how data are currently shared and analyzed, identify deficiencies and opportunities, and to help define new visions of how data can be found, analyzed, and used to make possible new syntheses and scientific discoveries.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Stevan Earl

Stevan Earl

Arizona State University

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

10:30am

Percentile-Range Indexed Mapping and Evaluation (PRIME): tool for long term ecological assessment
The U.S. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) programs have been collecting large quantities of data and environmental information since 1980. We developed a new Percentile Range Indexed Mapping and Evaluation (PRIME) tool to facilitate understanding of the status and evolution of long-term ecological processes, develop hypothesis and to support resource management decisions. PRIME is intended to serve as a common syntheses platform and applicable to any type of long-term data. We will demonstrate the application of PRIME using the data from the FCE and LUQ-LTER programs and highlight its broad applicability across the network.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Shimelis Dessu

Shimelis Dessu

Florida International University

Co-organizers
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University
WM

William McDowell

University of New Hampshire


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
11. Sanderling Meeting Room

10:30am

Soil microbial interactions driving coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles across the LTER network
Microbial stoichiometry drives coupled carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles at the ecosystem scale. For example, recent work suggests that labile C availability mediates N competition between heterotrophic soil microbes and autotrophic nitrifiers. The rate of nitrification as related to N mineralization affects ecosystem N losses via leaching and denitrification. In this workshop, we aim to explore how C and N availability influence interactions between microbial heterotrophs and autotrophs, and identify how these coupled relationships vary across ecosystems. The workshop will leverage data from C and N manipulation experiments across LTER sites and provide insight into the microbial processes that couple ecosystem C and N cycles.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Ashley Keiser

Ashley Keiser

NatureNet Science Fellow, University of Minnesota

Co-organizers
AG

Allison Gill

University of Minnesota


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

10:30am

Strategies for building ecological data literacy of students and teachers
This session will take a big picture view of ecological data literacy with a primary focus on how to harness the power of the LTER network to build ecological data literacy of students and to contribute to the body of research on this topic. We will present relevant insights from the literature and several LTER sites will share strategies and learning outcomes for engaging students with data. We will then facilitate a discussion in small groups to identify needs for additional idea sharing, professional development, assessment and/or research among the LTER network. This topic will continue to be explored in the session about new tools for student data exploration and analysis.

Lead Organizer
KO

Kari O'Connell

Oregon State University

Co-organizers
avatar for Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz

Head of Education, The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
K-12 and Undergraduate Ecology EducationData Literacy in EcologyBuilding and nurturing a diverse community of scientists, educators and participants in LTERThe Undergraduate Field Experience Research Network (UFERN)The LTER REU Initiative
avatar for Annette Brickley

Annette Brickley

Education Manager, WHOI
I'm a science education consultant working for myself as STEMming the Gaps Consulting. I have taught in both formal and informal education settings, from chemistry to oceanography to space science to climate change. I'm a trained facilitator for NNOCCI, the National Network of Ocean... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Snow

Pamela Snow

Harvard Forest, Harvard Forest
I coordinate the Schoolyard Ecology program at Harvard Forest, connecting teachers with professional Ecologists, and bringing K-12 students into the world of field ecology. In coordinating professional development opportunities, we provide opportunities for teachers to learn how to... Read More →
avatar for Steven McGee

Steven McGee

The Learning Partnership


Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

10:30am

Alda Center: Science Communication Essentials
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Science Communication Essentials. During the one-day workshop, Alda Center instructors will guide participants through improvisation exercises to help them become more aware of connecting and engaging with various audiences. Participants will notice a transformation in the way they approach communication, relating to others in a more empathic way. This is the basis for good communication, and the fundamental approach for the Alda Method™.

Background: In his many years hosting the Scientific American Frontiers television program, Alan Alda interviewed hundreds of scientists. He found them to be personable and engaging in direct conversation, but noticed that they often had trouble connecting with an abstract "audience." He thought that some of the tools that actors use to learn how to connect (notably, improvisation training) might be useful for scientists.  In 2009, Stonybrook University (along with Stony Brook School of Journalism, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) partnered with Alda to begin building a program that could improve science communication on a large scale.  

The Alda Center for Communicating Science and the Alda Center for Communications Training now offer a wide variety of workshops, from one-day introductions to  week-long bootcamps. Their programs are among the most effective and enjoyable communications trainings for scientists.

Workshop Instructors:
James Rea (jrea@expertsclearly.com)
James Rea is a communications coach and consultant who specializes in helping scientists, engineers, and other technical experts reach their key audiences with clear, engaging stories.  James started on this path nearly 20 years ago, when he took on a communications role with the U.S. EPA’s Design for the Environment Program. In 1998 James left the EPA to bring stories of science and sustainability to a wider audience as an independent reporter and producer for National Public Radio. His work aired on NPR affiliate stations around the country, most often reaching listeners via the airwaves of WAMU 88.5 FM in Washington, DC.  In 2001, James began his own communications consulting practice, putting his skills to work for a variety of clients including the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute, the Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering at Yale, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. James continues this work now as an instructor for Alda Center workshops, driven by his passion for helping scientists, engineers and other technical experts share their inspiring and vitally important work with the world.

David Calvitto (dcalvitto@gmail.com)
David Calvitto lives in Manhattan and has been an improvisation instructor for the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science since March 2016. He taught acting and improvisation for 20 years throughout New York and New Jersey, at Oberlin College in Ohio and for the Cape Cod Theatre Project in Woods Hole before joining the Alda Center. As an actor, he’s performed in London’s West End, throughout the United Kindom and internationally in Australia, Barbados, Canada, Germany, Holland, Ireland and New Zealand since 2004. He’s directed plays in New York, London, Adelaide and Edinburgh. From 1982 to 1994, David was an ESL teacher, teacher trainer and then administrator in the English school component of a large immigrant resettlement organization called The New York Association for New Americans (NYANA).

Lead Organizer
avatar for David Calvitto

David Calvitto

Alda Communications Training
David Calvitto lives in Manhattan and has been an improvisation instructor for the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science since March 2016. He taught acting and improvisation for 20 years throughout New York and New Jersey, at Oberlin College in Ohio and for the Cape Cod Theatre... Read More →
avatar for James Rea

James Rea

Alda Communications Training
James Rea is a communications coach and consultant who specializes in helping scientists, engineers, and other technical experts reach their key audiences with clear, engaging stories. James started on this path nearly 20 years ago, when he took on a communications role with the U.S... Read More →

Wednesday October 3, 2018 10:30am - 6:00pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

12:00pm

1:30pm

Educational tools for student data exploration and analysis
The LTER network is a significant contributor to the myriad of publicly available datasets and leading a transformation of research in the environmental sciences. Yet, teachers and students continue to have limited access to authentic data experiences and have significant challenges making sense of data using spreadsheet-based graphing tools. By sharing user-friendly tools, we provide a means to engage students in the process of exploring, analyzing, and summarizing long-term ecosystem data. With the Data Jam model, students then creatively communicate their discoveries to non-scientific audiences. This workshop will introduce participants to two analysis tools that make the practice of data interpretation more accessible to students.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Steven McGee

Steven McGee

The Learning Partnership

Co-organizers
avatar for Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz

Head of Education, The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
K-12 and Undergraduate Ecology EducationData Literacy in EcologyBuilding and nurturing a diverse community of scientists, educators and participants in LTERThe Undergraduate Field Experience Research Network (UFERN)The LTER REU Initiative
avatar for Annette Brickley

Annette Brickley

Education Manager, WHOI
I'm a science education consultant working for myself as STEMming the Gaps Consulting. I have taught in both formal and informal education settings, from chemistry to oceanography to space science to climate change. I'm a trained facilitator for NNOCCI, the National Network of Ocean... Read More →
avatar for Noelia Baez

Noelia Baez

Education Coordinator, University of Puerto Rico - Rio Piedras


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

1:30pm

Long-Term Ecological Research and Ecological Theories: Converging on New Paradigms
We will present a broad synthesis of the major theoretical framework(s) developed and tested across LTER sites for specific ecosystems and organisms. Participants from each site should come prepared to discuss (i) the motivation for theories used at their site, (ii) how long-term research is integrated into the theoretical framework (if at all), and (iii) which of the datasets from the LTER 5 cores areas of research (primary production, inorganic nutrients, organic matter, populations and communities, and disturbance) are most important for explaining both the site-specific theoretical framework and the importance of long-term data collection to the theory.

Lead Organizer
avatar for John Kominoski

John Kominoski

Associate Professor & Co-PI Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Florida International University

Co-organizers
avatar for Bailey McMeans

Bailey McMeans

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University
JB

John Blair

Professor, Kansas State University
PG

Peter Groffman

City University of New York and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
TH

Tamara Harms

University of Alaska Fairbanks


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

1:30pm

Using Drones for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Long Term Observations
This workshop will introduce researchers to the use of drones for imaging study sites and best practices for creating actionable products and time series. We will start with the basics: FAA licensing, flight training, and designing a mission plan. We will discuss avoiding common hazards such as adverse weather conditions and low flying aircraft. The workshop will cover the use of color and multi/hyperspectral imaging, including the use of ground control points for georeferencing and reflectance panels for image calibration. We will demo software for creating orthomosaics of drone imagery and common classification techniques. Finally, we will discuss the scaling of this high-resolution imagery to spaceborne remote sensing technologies.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Tom Bell

Tom Bell

Postdoc, UC Santa Barbara
I work at the intersection of ecology, environmental science, and physiology and use remotely sensed imagery (satellite/aerial/UAV, color/multispectral/hyperspectral). I most often work with coastal marine primary producers (kelp/seagrass/coral reefs) but have dabbled in arid/semi-arid... Read More →

Co-organizers
avatar for John Schalles

John Schalles

Investigator, Creighton
I use satellite and aerial remote sensing (including drones) to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of phytoplankton and wetlands in coastal environments. My work with the Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER includes recent documentation of long-term declines (35 years) in salt... Read More →
avatar for Max Castorani

Max Castorani

Assistant Professor, University of Virginia


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

1:30pm

Video Interviews with anyone in LTER Network
Come sit for a 5 min interview about your work with LTER and what long-term research means to you.

Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 3:30pm
13. Surf and Sand Meeting Room

1:30pm

Context-dependency of herbivore effects on function: roles of body size, productivity, and biome
Herbivores often impact primary producers, but are all herbivores made equal? Work in African savannas shows that body size can determine the strength of herbivore impact on plant community composition and ecosystem function. Although the Americas lack the wealth of large mammals found in Africa, herbivores across North American biomes are still diverse ranging from insects to bison and urchins to dugongs. LTER could play an important role in investigating the differential effects of herbivore size class in a variety of ecosystem types. In this workshop, we will discuss ways to create network-wide common experiments for examining the effects of herbivore types, as well as the potential for synthesis and meta-analysis on this topic.

Lead Organizer
SK

Sally Koerner

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Co-organizers
DB

Deron Burkepile

University of California Santa Barbara
KL

Kim La Pierre

Senior Scientist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
03. Acacia Meeting Room

1:30pm

Facilitating further integration of microbes into long-term ecological research
Soil, aquatic and host-associated microbes support ecosystem functions in multiple ways, and respond to environmental change with functional, population and community dynamics over multiple time scales. There is enthusiasm for understanding microbial changes at LTER sites, but barriers to doing so can be significant. As a whole group, participants in this workshop will discuss the key conceptual and operational challenges to integrating microorganisms into long-term studies; and in breakout groups, will work to define informative times, places and methods for microbial sampling and analysis in ecosystems representative of different LTER sites. We will clarify steps forward for understanding microbial responses to long-term change.

Lead Organizer
LZ

Lydia Zeglin

Kansas State University

Co-organizers
avatar for Kristen DeAngelis

Kristen DeAngelis

Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts
microbial ecology, environmental microbiology, climate change, warming, soils, phylogenetics, incorporating microbial processes into ecosystem models


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
14. Toyon Meeting Room

1:30pm

Incorporating the spatial ecology of consumers into long term ecological research
Often tucked away in the corner of most ecosystem box models, animals are typically viewed as minor players in the macro-movements of carbon and nutrients in ecosystems. However, in recent years, an increasing number of studies, many from the LTER network, have demonstrated the functional role of the movement and distribution of animals in mediating nutrient and carbon cycles in ecosystems. In the spirit of Next Generation Synthesis, this workshop will focus on formalizing the role animals and their movements play in cycling nutrients through ecosystems.

Lead Organizer
avatar for James Nelson

James Nelson

Assistant Professor, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
I am an interdisciplinary scientist most interested in the fish related components of marine ecosystems. I use a combination of field surveys, experimental approaches, stable isotope analysis, and mathematical modeling to quantify the functional role of marine organisms in mediating... Read More →

Co-organizers
BS

Bradley Strickland

PhD Candidate, Florida International University
RS

Rolando Santos

Southeast Environmental Research Center


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
07. Marlin Meeting Room

1:30pm

Inter-site comparison of aquatic function over entire surface water networks across LTER sites using
Scaling of aquatic ecosystem function to entire regions is problematic due to the wide range of riverine and lacustrine sizes, upstream-downstream connectivity, variability over time, and the confounding of loading and serial processing. LTERs collect long-term data sets at relatively few aquatic locations due to logistical constraints. But many LTERs periodically sample beyond temporally intensive locations. This workshop brings together researchers from aquatic LTER sites who have sampled synoptically and hierarchically throughout drainage networks to address drainage network scale function. A broad range of aquatic functions are of interest (e.g. GPP, ER, GHG production, nutrient retention, etc.).

Lead Organizer
WW

Wilfred Wollheim

University of New Hampshire

Co-organizers
TH

Tamara Harms

University of Alaska Fairbanks


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
09. Nautilus W Meeting Room

1:30pm

LTER Scenarios
In recent decades, scenario development has gained popularity as a tool to deal with complex, uncertain issues such as ecosystem change. Scenarios are plausible representations of the future, and serve to explore and compare future consequences of alternative actions and decisions. While a key intent of scenarios is to guide management, it is unclear how outputs from scenarios are integrated into decision-making. The goal of this workshop is to assess strengths and opportunities for doing scenario research in the LTER context. We aim to bring together LTER members involved in scenario research to compare the methods that we use, assess the impacts of our work, and identify better ways to inform management and planning.

Lead Organizer
MB

Marta Berbés-Blázquez

Arizona State University

Co-organizers
avatar for David Iwaniec

David Iwaniec

Georgia State University
avatar for Nancy Grimm

Nancy Grimm

Professor, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences
The year 2017 was dubbed “The Year of Extreme Weather” (NPR 2017), with three major hurricanes making landfall in the United States, while drought prevailed and fires raged in California and the Southwest. In the Anthropocene, people and ecosystems are experiencing extreme weather-related... Read More →


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
05. Dolphin Meeting Room

1:30pm

Remixing Instrumentation | Plug and Play Wireless Sensing and Logging for Scientists
In order to move science forward, researchers ask questions and attempt to measure things for which there are little-to-no off-the-shelf solutions. Our community is either forced to purchase expensive niche instrumentation, or procure devices and modify them to approximate what was originally intended. Electronics continue to decrease in cost and size, and increase in capability and internet connectivity. But to make your own instruments requires a steep learning curve in programming, engineering, and fabrication. You will be using prototypes of an opensource, plug-and-play wireless sensor-actuator control system for building your very own internet-enabled sensor logging and control systems and providing valuable feedback.

Lead Organizer
CU

Chet Udell

Oregon State University

Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
11. Sanderling Meeting Room

1:30pm

Synthesizing long-term community data: questions, challenges, and advances
Community dynamics play out over multiple years and long-term data sets are invaluable for understanding the processes that influence biodiversity across space and time. The LTER Network has supported the collection of long-term community data for decades, and these data form the basis of several LTER Synthesis Groups investigating biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships, community stability, and metacommunity ecology. In this workshop, we will hear how the synthesis groups and other researchers within, and outside of, the the LTER community are studying community dynamics. We’ll also discuss how to better leverage long-term data for deeper understanding of biodiversity across LTER sites and for inspiring future synthesis efforts.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Nathan Wisnoski

Nathan Wisnoski

PhD Candidate, Indiana University

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
15. Triton Meeting Room

1:30pm

Tracking foundation species dynamics from the mountains to the oceans in rapidly changing LTER sites
Foundation species, such as micro- and macroalgae, grasses and sedges, conifers, mangroves, and corals are dominant, habitat-forming organisms that ameliorate stress to facilitate whole communities of associated species. Speakers in this workshop will share their insights about how foundation species are responding to climate change, habitat loss and degradation, eutrophication, shifts in food webs and other pressures at LTER sites from the mountains to the oceans. Participants will also start working towards a white paper summarizing how foundation species’ cover, composition and effects on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are responding to these disturbances at LTER sites.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Luca Marazzi

Luca Marazzi

Postdoctoral Associate, Florida International University

Co-organizers
DG

Daniel Gann

Research Associate, Florida International University
EG

Evelyn Gaiser

Lead PI, Florida International University
KB

Kristin Briggs

Florida International University
MA

Merryl Alber

University of Georgia
NS

Nicholas Schulte

University of Colorado - Boulder


Wednesday October 3, 2018 1:30pm - 5:00pm
10. Oak Shelter

3:30pm

Best practices for designing climate change experiments and quantifying climate exposure
In this workshop, we will discuss two topics to improve methodology for studying climate change across sites: 1) determining the appropriate scale for manipulative climate change experiments, 2) quantifying the magnitude of climate change experienced by different areas of a landscape. At what scale should we manipulate temperature and precipitation to simulate climate change? Can we standardize our decision-making process? Many LTER sites feature fine-scale heterogeneity in topography, vegetation, soils, and hydrology. It is crucial to take this heterogeneity into account and discuss and standardize the quantification of microclimates across the landscape both in and out of manipulative experiments.

Lead Organizer
CF

Chiara Forrester

PhD Student, University of Colorado at Boulder and Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research

Co-organizers
avatar for Cliff Bueno de Mesquita

Cliff Bueno de Mesquita

University of Colorado at Boulder and Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research
Niwot Ridge, plant community ecology, microbial ecology, plant-microbe interactions, climate change


Wednesday October 3, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
08. Nautilus E Meeting Room

3:30pm

Making LTER Data Accessible and Useful for Students and Educators
How can we make LTER data more available and useful to K-16 educators and students? Scientists, educators and information managers are invited to this session organized jointly by the LTER Education Committee and the Ecological Data Initiative (EDI). We will summarize current practices and educational use of LTER data . Small groups then will discuss 1) identifying important, significant and distinctive LTER datasets, 2) Structuring of datasets for maximum accessibility and use, 3) potential guidelines or templates for dataset composition, structure and documentation for non-scientists, and 4) mechanisms for promotion and use. The session will end with a discussion of opportunities for future collaboration between LTER network members.

Lead Organizer
avatar for Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz

Head of Education, The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
K-12 and Undergraduate Ecology EducationData Literacy in EcologyBuilding and nurturing a diverse community of scientists, educators and participants in LTERThe Undergraduate Field Experience Research Network (UFERN)The LTER REU Initiative

Co-organizers
KO

Kari O'Connell

Oregon State University
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara
avatar for Pamela Snow

Pamela Snow

Harvard Forest, Harvard Forest
I coordinate the Schoolyard Ecology program at Harvard Forest, connecting teachers with professional Ecologists, and bringing K-12 students into the world of field ecology. In coordinating professional development opportunities, we provide opportunities for teachers to learn how to... Read More →


Wednesday October 3, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
12. Scripps Meeting Room

3:30pm

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) applications for LTER research
With their relatively cheap price and increasing effectiveness, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, also known as drones) are rapidly being implemented in ecological researches of different systems. This workshop will be an opportunity to discuss UAV applications for LTER-related research and develop proposals for network- wide UAV experiments and meta-analysis. We invite participants with interest and/or experience in UAVs-related research. A combination of presentations, discussion, and sharing of resources and results will provide LTER scientists with concepts, methods, cases, and networks to further the application of their own work.

Lead Organizer
NH

Niall Hanan

Co-lead PI, New Mexico State University

Co-organizers

Wednesday October 3, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
06. Evergreen Meeting Room

6:00pm

Farewell Barbecue
Wednesday October 3, 2018 6:00pm - 8:00pm
TBD
 
Thursday, October 4
 

7:30am

8:30am

McMurdo Dry Valleys LTER Site Meeting
Co-organizers
MG

Michael Gooseff

University of Colorado-Boulder


Thursday October 4, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
TBD

8:30am

Alda Center: Science Communication Essentials
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Science Communication Essentials. During the one-day workshop, Alda Center instructors will guide participants through improvisation exercises to help them become more aware of connecting and engaging with various audiences. Participants will notice a transformation in the way they approach communication, relating to others in a more empathic way. This is the basis for good communication, and the fundamental approach for the Alda Method™.

Background: In his many years hosting the Scientific American Frontiers television program, Alan Alda interviewed hundreds of scientists. He found them to be personable and engaging in direct conversation, but noticed that they often had trouble connecting with an abstract "audience." He thought that some of the tools that actors use to learn how to connect (notably, improvisation training) might be useful for scientists.  In 2009, Stonybrook University (along with Stony Brook School of Journalism, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) partnered with Alda to begin building a program that could improve science communication on a large scale.  

The Alda Center for Communicating Science and the Alda Center for Communications Training now offer a wide variety of workshops, from one-day introductions to  week-long bootcamps. Their programs are among the most effective and enjoyable communications trainings for scientists.

Workshop Instructors:
James Rea (jrea@expertsclearly.com)
James Rea is a communications coach and consultant who specializes in helping scientists, engineers, and other technical experts reach their key audiences with clear, engaging stories.  James started on this path nearly 20 years ago, when he took on a communications role with the U.S. EPA’s Design for the Environment Program. In 1998 James left the EPA to bring stories of science and sustainability to a wider audience as an independent reporter and producer for National Public Radio. His work aired on NPR affiliate stations around the country, most often reaching listeners via the airwaves of WAMU 88.5 FM in Washington, DC.  In 2001, James began his own communications consulting practice, putting his skills to work for a variety of clients including the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute, the Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering at Yale, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. James continues this work now as an instructor for Alda Center workshops, driven by his passion for helping scientists, engineers and other technical experts share their inspiring and vitally important work with the world.

David Calvitto (dcalvitto@gmail.com)
David Calvitto lives in Manhattan and has been an improvisation instructor for the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science since March 2016. He taught acting and improvisation for 20 years throughout New York and New Jersey, at Oberlin College in Ohio and for the Cape Cod Theatre Project in Woods Hole before joining the Alda Center. As an actor, he’s performed in London’s West End, throughout the United Kindom and internationally in Australia, Barbados, Canada, Germany, Holland, Ireland and New Zealand since 2004. He’s directed plays in New York, London, Adelaide and Edinburgh. From 1982 to 1994, David was an ESL teacher, teacher trainer and then administrator in the English school component of a large immigrant resettlement organization called The New York Association for New Americans (NYANA).

Lead Organizer
avatar for David Calvitto

David Calvitto

Alda Communications Training
David Calvitto lives in Manhattan and has been an improvisation instructor for the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science since March 2016. He taught acting and improvisation for 20 years throughout New York and New Jersey, at Oberlin College in Ohio and for the Cape Cod Theatre... Read More →
avatar for James Rea

James Rea

Alda Communications Training
James Rea is a communications coach and consultant who specializes in helping scientists, engineers, and other technical experts reach their key audiences with clear, engaging stories. James started on this path nearly 20 years ago, when he took on a communications role with the U.S... Read More →

Thursday October 4, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
04. Curlew Meeting Room

9:00am

12:00pm

Lunch
Lunch and dinner on October 4 are only included for individuals who are staying overnight on October 4.

6:00pm

Dinner
Lunch and dinner on October 4 are only included for individuals who are staying overnight on October 4.